New York City Department of Education

Most New York City high schools don’t have papers, and there are wide disparities in newspaper access across the city by race, geography, and poverty status.
In October alone, there were nearly 14,500 school bus delays, lasting 41 minutes on average.
“For some students, going back to a building for a full day just didn’t feel like it was for them anymore,” the school’s principal said.
Suspensions have fallen 64% over the past decade, though troubling racial disparities remain.
Both candidates have received big donations from those who influence New York’s education world — helping to paint a clearer picture of who is hoping to have sway over school policy.
There are still many open questions about how both would approach policy for schools.
The proposals would require either new funding or significant cuts to some campuses, both of which would likely face political hurdles.
Facing a budget shortfall because of enrollment declines, Soundview Academy’s principal made an unusual request to students, staff and families: Would they help market the school?
Many of the students are asylum seekers who have arrived recently from South American countries.
The share of students who were homeless has largely not budged even as public school enrollment has dipped by 9.5% since the pandemic.
The schedule obtained by Chalkbeat reveals who had the chancellor’s ear as he began navigating his first job running a school system.
Educators have reported myriad challenges at the schools, including a shortage of Spanish-speaking staff.
Chancellor Banks said students who work “really hard” should have priority access compared with “the child you have to throw water on their face to get them to go to school every day.”
Officials said the proposals will be reviewed by the chancellor and there will be opportunities for feedback by parent councils this winter.
NYC promised universal air conditioning by 2022. Dozens of educators, students, and parents told Chalkbeat that gaps in coverage remain.
Education department officials stressed that the community group partners in the $9 million initiative will offer far more than violence interruption.
The changes are supposed to be reflective of a system that pushes for improvements and support for all students, officials said.
The scores are the first measure of how students across the five boroughs have fared in reading and math since the coronavirus pandemic.
Training students to work together, especially under pressure, is at the core of how Billy Green teaches.
The move has prompted mixed reactions from educators and parents.
Even as New York City required students to return to in-person instruction last school year, hundreds of thousands of children missed large stretches of instruction, new figures show.
The lack of communication about the new plan has sowed confusion and concern among staff and preschool providers.
Families across the five boroughs are already mounting letter-writing campaigns and petitions for and against schools that use screens for admissions.
About 3,000 students at 59 schools — generally rising juniors and seniors — will be selected by employers for apprenticeships paying from $15 to $25 an hour.
Mayor Eric Adams and his schools chief David Banks made no secret of their top priority for the new school year: improving how schools teach children how to read.