New York City Department of Education

The eight-member expansion of the city’s education panel, which was passed under the original bill, will be delayed by five months.
XQ is supporting new robotics and design-themed high schools, the city’s new virtual academies, and three other projects.
Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
But like most things within the nation’s largest school district, what happens across New York City’s 1,600 schools often varies school to school and even classroom to classroom.
Due to recently announced budget cuts, parents fear they’ll see programs discontinued in the fall, and teachers are worried about their jobs.
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
Department officials plan to hire 200 coaches for grades K-5, down from roughly 500 coaches focusing on grades K-2 in prior years
The first-term mayor will be back in Albany sooner than he had hoped to renew mayoral control and will now also be tasked with shrinking class sizes.
The SEED program aims to help students who have sensory issues that are “dramatically impacting their school performance.”
NYC education officials plan to expand transfer high schools to serve those students, using a Bronx school as one model.
A four-year extension of mayoral control of city schools seems out of the picture for Mayor Eric Adams as he makes his pitch to Albany lawmakers.
About 57% of high school students are vaccinated, so the move will significantly increase the share of students who are eligible to attend.
The first-of-its-kind curriculum was meant to teach student students about urban planning and how to advocate for their neighborhoods.
Schools issued about 16% fewer suspension from July through December 2021 compared to the same period in 2019 before the pandemic hit.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
Questions remain about how the city will spend the remainder of billions in federal COVID stimulus funding on New York City’s school system.
“By not having a full board it kind of gives a message that it’s not a priority,” said Lori Podvesker, a former panel member.
Immigration advocates say that public schools can be “largely inaccessible” for thousands of immigrant students.
The delays could discourage some therapists from signing up for similar programs, complicating future efforts to provide extra help to students with disabilities.
One of the largest pushes this year went toward expanding free child care. The city’s public schools will receive just over $12 billion in state funding.
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