Coronavirus New York

Adams promised a telehealth program for all New York City high school students struggling with mental health. But officials offered few details on how it will work.
Schools are uniquely positioned to identify and support grieving children, but families and school staff say the system isn’t equipped to serve them.
Data obtained by Chalkbeat suggests that the temporary policy change — first canceling the English Regents and then not requiring a passing score to graduate — made it easier for English language learners to earn their diplomas.
NYC has used hundreds of millions worth of federal relief funding for programs with recurring costs, including pre-K and hiring more nurses and social workers.
David Banks vowed to ‘raise the issue’ with the health department.
Gov. Kathy Hochul’s proposals showed a deeper commitment to addressing how the pandemic impacted students both academically and mentally.
Advocates say they will push for solutions to issues that have become more pressing during the pandemic, including funding, hiring challenges, and student mental health.
CUNY launched a high-dosage tutoring program that pairs hundreds of aspiring educators with first and second graders who are struggling to read.
58% of NYC charter schools shrank during COVID, even as the sector grew overall. Two of the city’s major charter networks — Success Academy and Uncommon Schools — saw student enrollment shrink last year.
The Manhattan charter school had 17 of its 54 staff members out sick as of Tuesday. COVID, RSV, and the flu affected many staffers, officials from the Washington Heights school said.
There are still many open questions about how both would approach policy for schools.
Facing a budget shortfall because of enrollment declines, Soundview Academy’s principal made an unusual request to students, staff and families: Would they help market the school?
The share of students who were homeless has largely not budged even as public school enrollment has dipped by 9.5% since the pandemic.
The results mirrored math trends seen across the country, with historic drops for fourth graders. But reading scores defied the national trend.
The changes are supposed to be reflective of a system that pushes for improvements and support for all students, officials said.
The scores are the first measure of how students across the five boroughs have fared in reading and math since the coronavirus pandemic.
City officials have not yet shared what COVID safety measures will be in place next school year or what the city’s testing strategy might be.
Student enrollment has big implications for public schools, and declines can lead to less funding and school closures or mergers.
Stimulus dollars were previously not allowed to cover teacher salaries, but officials changed their tune amid a fight over budget cuts.
Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
New York City’s Class of 2022 returned to school full time after two disrupted years. Four graduating high school seniors told us about how they made it through.
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
Starting June 13, children under 5 will no longer be required to wear masks.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
The state began sending New York families $375 per child for food benefits, a retroactive move to cover meal costs from last summer.
Many organizations will face tough decisions about laying off staff and cutting back services that have been a cornerstone of the city’s much-lauded Community Schools program.
Anxiety, depression, and chronic absenteeism are on the rise as many students and parents struggle with school refusal after prolonged campus closures during COVID.
Icon-heart-donate
If you value Chalkbeat, consider making a donation
Chalkbeat is a nonprofit newsroom dedicated to providing the information families and educators need, but this kind of work isn’t possible without your help.