Students with disabilities

Most kids labeled as having an “emotional disability” and shunted into public special education schools are Black or Latino, and low income — while wealthier families more often access a taxpayer-funded free private education.
The scores are the first measure of how students across the five boroughs have fared in reading and math since the coronavirus pandemic.
At least 1,000 new students are expected to enroll in district schools, including preschool-aged children.
The eight-member expansion of the city’s education panel, which was passed under the original bill, will be delayed by five months.
Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
Students at the School of Design and Construction are partnering with IKEA to build a life skills learning lab for students with disabilities.
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
The SEED program aims to help students who have sensory issues that are “dramatically impacting their school performance.”
Of nearly 270 NYC elementary schools offering programs, only fewer than 30 still had openings as of Monday afternoon.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
The delays could discourage some therapists from signing up for similar programs, complicating future efforts to provide extra help to students with disabilities.
One of the largest pushes this year went toward expanding free child care. The city’s public schools will receive just over $12 billion in state funding.
With the end of the school year approaching, NYC schools have spent just about half of this year’s COVID relief, according to a comptroller report.
The largest chunk — about $1.9 billion — will be for an expansion of the city’s pre-K program for 3-year-olds over the next several years.
David Banks noted that the process at some of the city’s coveted “screened” schools is a lottery this year, which has resulted in backlash from parents of students with high grades.
It began as a work-around during remote learning. Then it changed my struggling student’s trajectory.
Tutoring and enrichment programs require finding staff to work extra hours in a moment when educators feel overworked.
Getting my child the help he needed shouldn’t have been so hard or costly.
If the new school comes to fruition, it would be the second public school in NYC to focus specifically on students with dyslexia. A charter opened with that mission in 2019.