Team Dorsey

Inner circle: Here’s who Superintendent Hopson leans on to lead Memphis schools

PHOTO: Shelby County Schools
Superintendent Dorsey Hopson speaks at a back-to-school press conference for Shelby County Schools for the 2017-18 school year.

Dorsey Hopson has been at the helm of Tennessee’s largest district for four years, but his cabinet has been a bit of a revolving door since the historic merger of city and county schools.

Only three members of his 11-person leadership team have been with Hopson since the Memphis attorney was named superintendent of Shelby County Schools in 2013.

As the 2017-18 school year begins, here are the lieutenants that Hopson has recruited to help him lead schools in one of the most challenging education landscapes in America.

Brian Stockton, chief of staff

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
Brian Stockton

Salary: $157,500
Duties: Oversees superintendent initiatives, supervises other chiefs and their departments, connects school-level staff to central office decision-making, cultivates relationships with local governing bodies, handles day-to-day emergencies.
His story: The Memphis native returned home last year after 25 years away, including a stint as a leadership analyst for a government contractor in Washington, D.C. There, he was in charge of stemming attrition, boosting morale and developing leaders. Stockton is a 1990 graduate of Central High School. (Read our Q&A with him when he joined Hopson’s team.)

Gerald Darling, chief of student services

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
Gerald Darling

Salary: $163,200
Duties: Leads security teams and prevention programs around truancy, gang involvement, violence and out-of-school suspensions, as well as sports, medical and emergency services for schools.
His story: Darling was chief of police for Miami-Dade Schools from 2004 to 2008, when former Memphis City Schools Superintendent Kriner Cash hired him to lead the district’s security division, a new cabinet post at the time.

 

Sharon Griffin, chief of schools

PHOTO: Kayleigh Skinner
Sharon Griffin

Salary: $165,000
Duties: Supervises and supports principals and oversee teacher coaching, leadership development, virtual schools and the Innovation Zone school turnaround program.
Her story: Griffin was promoted to her new job in January after five years as regional superintendent of the iZone, one of the district’s most successful programs. Before that, she led a turnaround effort as principal of Airways Middle School. A Memphis native, Griffin is a graduate of LeMoyne-Owen College and received her doctorate at the University of Memphis. She was named Tennessee’s 2015 supervisor of the year.

Lin Johnson, chief of finance

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
Lin Johnson

Salary: $155,000
Duties: Crafts and maintains the district’s budget, monitors spending, looks for new sources of revenue, and allocates money to the district’s nearly 200 schools.
His story: Johnson was hired in 2015 after serving as director of special initiatives for the Tennessee Department of Education and director of finance and operations for the District of Columbia Public Charter School Board.

 

Brad Leon, chief of strategy and performance management

PHOTO: SCS
Brad Leon

Salary: $157,500
Duties: Oversees charter schools, school accountability and testing, planning and research.
His story: Leon started out with Teach For America as a middle school teacher at a New Orleans charter school, where he was voted Teacher of the Year in 2002. He went on to become a regional vice president at Teach For America and the first regional executive director of TFA in Memphis from 2006 to 2010. He joined Hopson’s cabinet in 2013 to lead the district’s innovation department.

 

Rodney Moore, chief general counsel

Rodney Moore

Salary: $192,270
Duties: Oversees legal matters, including the district’s funding lawsuit against the state.
His story: Moore joined the district in 2016. He previously was a partner in Atlanta with Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith, which the district hired in 2015 to explore litigation against the state over funding. He is a former president of the National Bar Association and has served on the National School Board Association’s Council of School Lawyers.

Leon Pattman, chief of internal audit

PHOTO: SCS
Leon Pattman

Salary: $143,820
Duties: Evaluates processes, monitors operations, leads risk management strategies.
His story: Pattman came to Shelby County Schools in 2015 from the City of Memphis, where he was the chief audit executive. He has held roles in finance, compliance, auditing and information management with the U.S. Treasury and U.S. Air Force.

 

Beth Phalen, chief of business operations

PHOTO: SCS
Beth Phalen

Salary: $176,000
Duties: Oversees facilities planning and maintenance, nutrition services, district purchases and contracts, transportation and risk management.
Her story: The most recent hire to Hopson’s cabinet, Phalen previously was executive vice president of strategy and operations for ISS Facility Services and vice president of business operations at Memphis-based ServiceMaster.

 

 

Natalia Powers, chief of communications & community engagement

PHOTO: SCS
Natalia Powers

Salary: $139,230
Duties: Oversees internal and external communications, media relations, digital and print publications, social media, television and radio broadcasting services, and community outreach.
Her story: Powers was hired in 2016 after climbing the ranks in the school district of Palm Beach, Fla., from translator and interpreter, teacher for English language learners, program coordinator, and head of communications and community engagement.

 

Trinette Small, chief of human resources

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
Trinette Small

Salary: $141,500
Duties: Handles recruiting and retaining employees as well as salaries and benefits.
Her story: Small has held this job since the creation of Shelby County Schools following the merger of city and county schools in 2013.

 

 

John Williams, chief information officer

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
John Williams

Salary: $158,100
Duties: Provides data systems for administrators and classroom technology for students and teachers.
His story: Williams was hired in 2015 after serving in the same role with Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools. He has held technology and telecommunications positions with Atlanta Public Schools and Orange County Schools in Orlando, Fla.

 

 

Editor’s note: Salary information is based on a list of full-time positions with Shelby County Schools as of April 2017. District officials did not confirm those numbers after multiple requests.

More money

Aurora school board campaigns pulling in money from big names

Aurora's school board candidates at a candidate forum hosted by RISE Colorado. (Photo by Yesenia Robles)

New big names are stepping in to contribute to Aurora’s school board races this year, including some longtime contributors to some Denver school board candidates.

Daniel Ritchie, a Denver philanthropist, and Patrick Hamill, the founder and CEO of Oakwood Homes, contributed to some Aurora candidates this year, according to new campaign finance reports that were due Tuesday. State records show they had not in the past. Ritchie in 2012 did support an Aurora committee to pass a tax measure for the school district.

The contributions are further evidence of Aurora’s growing profile among education reform advocates. Over the last three years, the district’s school improvement work has attracted the attention of groups and think tanks that sense opportunity in a traditionally overlooked district with a large population of underserved students. A couple of Denver’s popular college-prep charter school operators, DSST and Rocky Mountain Prep, have put down roots in Aurora.

The new campaign finance reports show that eight school board candidates vying for one of four seats on the Aurora school board raised almost $50,000 so far. One candidate, incumbent Barbara Yamrick, had not filed a report as of Wednesday afternoon.

Because four of the school board’s seven seats are up for election, and only one incumbent is attempting re-election, November’s winners could align as a majority and point the district in a new direction.

The district’s profile has risen among education watchers as it attempts reforms of some of the lowest performing schools in the state. Its strategies include an innovation zone where five schools have new autonomy from district, union and state rules, and through an evolving new process for opening charter schools.

The candidates who have raised the most amount of money are Miguel In Suk Lovato, who reported $14,181 in donations, and Gail Pough, who reported $10,181.32.

How much did candidates raise, spend?

  • Gail Pough, $10,181.32; 6,533.24
  • Lea Steed, $1,355.00; 878.24
  • Kyla Armstrong Romero, $6,365.55; 3,019.81
  • Kevin Cox, $2,554.00; $2,291.93
  • Miguel Lovato, $14,181.00; $9,336.96
  • Jane Barber, $150.00; $988.10
  • Debbie Gerkin, $7,755.43; $2,350.24
  • Marques Ivey, $4,965.30; $2,791.84/li>
  • Barbara Yamrick, did not file

Both received donations from Ritchie, Hamill and Democrats for Education Reform. Lovato also reported donations from Linda Childears, the president and CEO of the Daniels Fund, and other Daniels Fund employees. Lovato works there as a senior grants program officer. Pough also reported donations from Denver school board candidate Jennifer Bacon, and Democratic state Rep. Rhonda Fields.

Candidate Lea Steed and Debbie Gerkin also received donations from Democrats for Education Reform.

The organization had contributed to Aurora candidates in the past, but on a smaller scale.

Union interests also have been active. Four candidates, Gerkin, Kyla Armstrong-Romero, Kevin Cox and Marques Ivey, are organized as a slate endorsed by Aurora’s teacher’s union. The Public Education Committee, which is a union funded committee, donated $1,125 directly to candidate campaigns. The same committee also reported in-kind donations, meaning non-monetary, of almost $3,000 to three of the slate members, for polling.

The candidates also reported their expenditures, which mostly consisted of consultant fees, advertising materials or yard signs and rental space or food for volunteers.
Reports filed earlier in the week from independent expenditure committees show Democrats for Education Reform and union groups have also spent money this year to advocate for some Aurora school board candidates on their own. Independent expenditure committees are not allowed to donate directly to candidates, but can campaign on their own for or against candidates. Their reports were due earlier this week.

Movers & shakers

Haslam names three West Tennesseans to State Board of Education    

PHOTO: TDOE
Members of the Tennessee State Board of Education listen to a July presentation about TNReady scores by Education Commissioner Candice McQueen.

A Memphis real estate executive, a Cordova lawyer and a Decatur County high school student are the newest members of Tennessee’s State Board of Education.

Gov. Bill Haslam announced appointments this week to dozens of state boards and commissions, including the 11-member education panel, which sets policy for K-12 schools in Tennessee.

The new members are:

  • Darrell Cobbins

    Darrell Cobbins is a Memphis native and third-generation real estate professional who attended Catholic, public and private schools. He has degrees from Rhodes College and the University of Memphis and worked for the Greater Memphis Chamber of Commerce. He is president of Universal Commercial Real Estate, which he founded in 2007. Representing the ninth congressional district, he replaces William Troutt, who retired this year as president of Rhodes College and is moving out of state.

  • Lang Wiseman is an attorney in Cordova who graduated from Bolton High School in Arlington. He attended the University of Tennessee on a basketball scholarship and finished as the 24th leading scorer in the school’s history. Wiseman went on to graduate from Harvard Law School and is a partner at Wiseman Bray Attorneys. Representing the eighth congressional district, he replaces Cato Johnson, who accepted a position on the University of Memphis Board of Trustees.

  • Haden Bawcum, of Bath Springs, is the board’s student member, a position that changes annually. He is a senior at Riverside High School in Decatur County.

The appointments became effective in July and are expected to be confirmed by state lawmakers early next year. Board members are not paid.

B. Fielding Rolston is chairman of the board. A retired executive with Eastman Chemical Co. in Kingsport, he was first appointed in 1996.

You can find answers to the board’s frequently asked questions here.