Who Is In Charge

Union pushing more ‘authentic’ assessments in teacher evaluations

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew.

When the dust settled after this year’s legislative session, New York state’s 2015 teacher evaluation law had been effectively dismantled.

That evaluation system, designed to give more weight to standardized test scores, could no longer include grades 3-8 math and English state tests — and districts were given an extra few months to figure out how to fill that gap.

Now, details are emerging about what that might look like in New York City.

In an email sent to United Federation of Teachers chapter leaders, UFT President Michael Mulgrew said the union is currently negotiating with the city to add more “authentic” measures of student learning in teacher evaluations.

“Our goal in the current negotiations is to have as many options as possible of authentic student learning not based on standardized test scores,” the email reads.

Mulgrew reiterated that point at a UFT meeting last week, where he reportedly told UFT chapter leaders he would not agree to a new teacher evaluation system until he had secured more such “authentic” student learning measures. (Chapter leader Arthur Goldstein blogged about it after the meeting.)

The union did not comment further on what those assessments might include, since they are still hashing out the details of the new evaluation system with the city. The new evaluations must be finalized by the end of December, but in Mulgrew’s email to chapter leaders, he said he hopes to finish earlier in the school year.

New York City already has a system of exams, beyond the state’s traditional standardized tests, that schools can choose to factor into their teacher evaluations. These exams are called “Measures of Student Learning” or MOSLs, and they take a number of forms, including essays, oral reading assessments, or performance-based music exams. In the email to chapter leaders, Mulgrew indicated that MOSL options might expand before the end of negotiations.

In an April op-ed in City & State, Mulgrew called for more semester-long assessments. “As New York weans itself off its reliance on fill-in-the-bubble tests, it should be looking at strategies like projects and portfolios that cover an entire semester or even a year of work and offer a real assessment of what students can do,” he wrote.

Jake Jacobs, an art teacher at New Directions Secondary School in the Bronx, said assessments that show learning over time would be a more “authentic” way to measure a teacher’s work.

“What ‘authentic’ assessments mean in my department is actual student work, sometimes with teacher feedback on it, sometimes showing progress,” Jacobs wrote in an email. “Maybe in a portfolio, digitally, or on display where it can be analyzed to determine what’s going on in that classroom over time.”

Experimenting with new types of assessments is in line with the State Education Department’s priorities. Commissioner MaryEllen Elia wanted New York to participate in a pilot that will allow seven states to experiment with new types of assessments, though that project may be derailed by a lack of funding.

State officials have to approve any new assessments used to evaluate teachers, but so far they seem open to more creative options. Officials said they welcome applications that include more authentic measures of student learning, as long as those assessments are valid and reliable.


Aurora’s superintendent will get a contract extension

Aurora Public Schools Superintendent Rico Munn. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

The Aurora school board is offering superintendent Rico Munn a contract extension.

Marques Ivey, the school board president, made the announcement during Tuesday’s regular board meeting.

“The board of education believes we are headed in the right direction,” Ivey said. Munn can keep the district going in the right direction, he added.

The contract extension has not been approved yet. Munn said Tuesday night that it had been sent to his lawyer, but he had not had time to review it.

Munn took the leadership position in Aurora Public Schools in 2013. His current contract is set to expire at the end of June.

Munn indicated he intends to sign the new contract after he has time to review it. If he does so, district leaders expect the contract to be on the agenda of the board’s next meeting, April 3, for a first review, and then for a vote at the following meeting.

Details about the new offer, including the length of the extension or any salary increases, have not been made public.

Four of the seven members currently on the board were elected in November as part of a union-supported slate. Many voiced disapproval of some of the superintendent’s reform strategies such as his invitation to charter school network DSST to open in Aurora.

In their first major vote as a new board, the board also voted against the superintendent’s recommendation for the turnaround of an elementary school, signaling a disagreement with the district’s turnaround strategies.

But while several Aurora schools remain low performing, last year the district earned a high enough rating from the state to avoid a path toward state action.

cooling off

New York City charter leader Eva Moskowitz says Betsy DeVos is not ‘ready for prime time’

PHOTO: Chalkbeat
Success Academy CEO and founder Eva Moskowitz seemed to be cooling her support for U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

In New York City, Eva Moskowitz has been a lone voice of support for the controversial U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. But even Moskowitz appears to be cooling on the secretary following an embarrassing interview.

“I believe her heart is in the right place,” Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy, said of DeVos at an unrelated press conference. “But as the recent interviews indicate, I don’t believe she’s ready for primetime in terms of answering all of the complex questions that need to be answered on the topic of public education and choice.”

That is an apparent reference to DeVos’s roundly criticized appearance on 60 Minutes, which recently aired a 30-minute segment in which the secretary admits she hasn’t visited struggling schools in her tenure. Even advocates of school choice, DeVos’s signature issue, called her performance an “embarrassment,” and “Saturday Night Live” poked fun at her.  

Moskowitz’s comments are an about-face from when the education secretary was first appointed. While the rest of the New York City charter school community was mostly quiet after DeVos was tapped for the position, Moskowitz was the exception, tweeting that she was “thrilled.” She doubled-down on her support months later in an interview with Chalkbeat.

“I believe that education reform has to be a bipartisan issue,” she said.

During Monday’s press conference, which Success Academy officials called to push the city for more space for its growing network, Moskowitz also denied rumors, fueled by a tweet from AFT President Randi Weingarten, that Success officials had recently met with members of the Trump administration.

Shortly after the election, Moskowitz met with Trump amid speculation she was being considered for the education secretary position. This time around, she said it was “untrue” that any visits had taken place.

“You all know that a while back, I was asked to meet with the president-elect. I thought it was important to take his call,” she said. “I was troubled at the time by the Trump administration. I’m even more troubled now. And so, there has been no such meeting.”