getting the green light

Exclusive: After year delay, city will allow diversity plans at several schools

PHOTO: Anika Anand
Children play in the gym of P.S. 133 in Park Slope in 2013. The school's admissions system, which sets aside some seats for low-income students and English learners, has served as a model for other schools hoping to maintain a diverse mix of students.

The city will allow seven schools to change their admissions policies to make sure they enroll a diverse mix of students, sources said Thursday, more than a year after a group of principals began lobbying to do so.

The education department would not immediately confirm that the plans had been approved. But people with direct knowledge of the schools’ proposals, who were not authorized to speak publicly, said an official announcement was expected Friday.

The schools will be able to reserve a portion of their available seats — anywhere from 10 to 60 percent — for low-income students, English learners, students who are involved in the child-welfare system, or children who have incarcerated parents, according to sources.

The expected announcement would represent a significant shift for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has spoken about the value of school diversity but has been reluctant to make policy changes to promote it. The previous administration let one district school, P.S. 133 in Park Slope, adopt a diversity-focused admissions policy, but the current administration has so far declined to sign off on similar policies that other schools have requested.

The policy shift comes as the city has faced increasing pressure to directly address school segregation and the lack of student diversity at many schools, a push partly sparked by racially charged debates over rezoning proposals in Brooklyn and Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Last month, education department officials bowed to that pressure by moving to strike a footnote from the city’s school admissions code that had been criticized for potentially blocking efforts to create diverse schools.

“Empowering elementary schools to use admissions processes that strengthen diversity is a strong step in our ongoing effort to confront the segregation of our schools,” City Councilman Brad Lander said in a statement. He and Councilman Ritchie Torres co-sponsored a bill, which de Blasio signed into law this spring, that will force the education department to report annually on school demographics and its efforts to increase diversity within schools.

Two schools in Lander’s district — Brooklyn New School and Brooklyn Children’s School — are among those that will be allowed to adopt new admissions policies. The other schools are: the Academy of Arts & Letters in Fort Greene, Brooklyn Arts and Science Elementary School in Crown Heights, the Earth School and the Neighborhood School in the East Village, and Castle Bridge School in Washington Heights, according to people with knowledge of the plans.

In Oct. 2014, a group of principals met with top department officials and floated diverse-enrollment plans similar to that at P.S. 133, which the Bloomberg administration allowed to reserve more than a third of its seats for low-income students and those still learning English. The idea is to preserve a diverse mix of students at the schools even as more white and affluent students enroll. At the start of this school year, several of the principals said they had yet to hear back from the city about their proposals.

But in recent days, advocates who have been pushing de Blasio to do more to promote school integration said they have heard that the city was preparing to allow some of the schools to save a portion of seats — or create “set-asides” — for particular student groups.

“My understanding is that now they’re granting set-asides to certain individual schools,” said David Goldsmith, president of the Community Education Council in Brooklyn’s District 13, where P.S. 133 is located.

Principals from P.S. 133 and three other District 13 schools attended last year’s diversity meeting with top officials, including Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña. One of the schools was the Academy of Arts & Letters, which has seen its share of low-income students fall from about three-quarters to less than 40 percent over the past several years as the school’s neighborhood has rapidly gentrified. Under its newly approved plan, the school will be able to reserve 40 percent of available seats for low-income students — effectively keeping its share of those students from shrinking any further.

Admissions systems like those the city is set to approve can help schools in gentrifying areas avoid “tipping,” or switching from a mix of students from different backgrounds to a majority of students from middle-class families that are settling in the school’s neighborhood.

While advocates have welcomed the prospect of the city granting individual schools permission to tweak their admissions policies to ensure diversity, they have also argued that district-wide policies are crucial. Otherwise, a school with set-asides might enroll a mix of students while surrounding schools could become increasingly segregated.

“If you solve a problem in one school and create a greater problem in five schools as a result,” said Goldsmith, the CEC president, “what are you really accomplishing?”

Education department spokeswoman Devora Kaye said that the city is working with educators, parents, and lawmakers to promote school diversity.

“Students learn from the diverse experiences and cultures of their fellow students, and it’s important that our schools reflect the diversity of our City,” she said in a statement.

counterpoint

Some Asian American groups have backed the SHSAT, but this one says the exam should go

PHOTO: Alex Zimmerman
Stuyvesant High School is one of the city's most sought-after specialized high schools.

In the fight to integrate New York City’s coveted specialized high schools, one source of opposition has stood out.

Asian parents and alumni have waved signs at City Hall, heckled education leaders at town halls, and marched in protest of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to eliminate the test that serves as the sole entrance criteria for the elite schools.

That’s why it’s noteworthy that the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families is calling for the test to be nixed in favor of an admissions system that weighs multiple factors, releasing a report on Tuesday that attempts to bring nuance to a debate that has often played out in sound bites.

“We believe that current admissions processes to specialized high schools contribute to the problems of segregation and inequity in NYC public schools,” the advocacy organization’s report notes.

Specialized high schools enroll a disproportionate share of Asian students. Many have argued that the mayor’s plan, which aims to enroll more black and Hispanic students in the schools, pits one community of color against others. Only about 10 percent of specialized high school students are black or Hispanic, even though those students comprise about 70 percent of enrollment citywide.

The Coalition’s report offers a counter-narrative to the debate, highlighting that many Asian organizations have long called for admissions changes at the specialized high schools and arguing that Asian students would benefit from an overhaul.

But the organization stops short of endorsing de Blasio’s proposal, blasting his administration for failing to include the Asian community in its development or rollout. (One of the coalition’s co-directors is a mayoral appointee to the citywide Panel for Educational Policy.)  

“We remain highly critical of the processes that he and the Department of Education have taken in crafting and releasing those proposals to the public,” the report says.

An education department spokesman said the city looks forward to working with the coalition to eliminate the test, and said the city is presenting its plan to every community school district.

The report comes as parents are considering suing over the city’s diversity efforts and supporters of the test have hired a lobbyist to fight the potential changes.

The coalition’s stance also highlights the steep challenge de Blasio faces as he gears up to lobby state lawmakers to scrap the entrance exam, which is currently required by state law. Though Democrats managed to gain control of the Senate in the latest election, the issue doesn’t have a clear party line — and some of the mayor’s natural allies have expressed doubt, or even backed away from the mayor’s proposal.

Read the full report here

By the numbers

Enrollment is up in Tennessee’s largest school district for second straight year

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede/Chalkbeat

After several years of steady decline, Shelby County Schools is continuing an upward trend in student enrollment.

About 111,600 students attend schools in Tennessee’s largest district, up about 2 percent from last year and higher than projected enrollment, according to district numbers.

That includes about 15,300 students enrolled in charter schools overseen by the local district, who now make up about 13.5 percent, a slight uptick from last year.

The increase could signal a growing trust in public school options in Memphis and that recruitment and early registration efforts are continuing to pay off. Last year was the first year the Memphis district gained students since six suburbs exited the district to create their own school systems with about 34,000 students.

However, enrollment in the state’s district for low-performing schools dipped for the second year in a row to 10,622 students. The Achievement School District, which mostly operates in Memphis, has lost about 2,000 students since 2016 as schools have closed and money for school improvement efforts has dropped off.

Note: The numbers are taken from each district’s attendance on the 20th day of school, which leaders use to determine any staffing adjustments to match a school’s student population.

Sharon Griffin, the Achievement School District’s chief, told Chalkbeat that she focused her efforts this semester on restarting the district’s relationship with the neighborhoods its serves, and that she is hopeful to see gains in enrollment throughout the year.

“Most of our schools have met their projected enrollment, but we have one or two elementaries that are struggling,” Griffin said. “Part of that is due to the fact that new charter schools and options that have opened up in neighborhoods we’re in, where there’s not enough kids in the neighborhood.”

Five charters schools opened this year as five others — a mix of district-run and charter schools — closed.

Notably, Shelby County Schools’ charter sector is growing faster than the district. The number of Memphis students attending charter schools overseen by the district increased 5.8 percent this year, while enrollment in district-run schools increased about 2 percent. Shelby County Schools did not provide a statement or an official for comment.

Nationally, the average charter school enrollment has increased from 1 to 6 percent of students between 2000 and 2015, according to federal data. That year, Tennessee charter schools enrolled 3 percent of students.

In response, the local district has looked to charter schools for recruitment strategies in an increasingly competitive environment. Over the summer, Shelby County Schools doubled down on recruitment and registration efforts by sending officials to grocery stores, libraries, summer camps, the Memphis Zoo and community centers — and has even hosted block parties throughout the city. The district also opened its online application two months earlier than last year to encourage parents to register sooner.

Those efforts resulted in 70 percent of expected students to register for school two weeks before school, which was double from the previous year.