• Graduation rates have been rising steadily since 2002. A team of reporters around the country go deep on the strategies schools have been using to drive that increase. (NPR Ed)
  • The national movement to extend the school day with after-school programs is prompting school districts and community organizations to share data and strategies in new ways. (EdWeek)
  • One in four black young people are neither in school nor employed in nine American cities featured in a new report. (The Atlantic)
  • Don’t miss WNYC’s series on a transgender third grader attending a Brooklyn public school. (SchoolBook)
  • A group of students is petitioning the College Board to let them retake the SAT for free after an error caused scores from one section of the test to be thrown out. (Answer Sheet)
  • Here’s what test-taking looks like in Baltimore, India, Pakistan, South Korea and more places around the world. (The Atlantic)
  • And in China, officials are using drones to identify students who cheat on the country’s college entrance examination. (CBS News)
  • Renovations at an Oklahoma school uncovered 100-year-old chalkboard drawings. (NewsOK)
  • A fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute takes a deep look at the changes that have reshaped New Orleans schools since Hurricane Katrina. (Washington Monthly)
  • Michael Petrilli used a linguistic algorithm to analyze the tweets of prominent education policy officials, teachers and writers and found a lot of upbeat, analytic people. (Education Next)
  • Even though college tuition in Norway is completely free, the children of parents without a college degree are just as unlikely to attend as American children of parents who didn’t go. (Hechinger Report)
  • The Mexican government has reinstated its new teacher evaluation plan after the country’s June 7 elections, which the teachers union had threatened to disrupt, were carried out smoothly. (EdWeek)
  • The New York teenager who spent more three years on Riker’s Island, much of it in solitary confinement, waiting on a trial that never happened committed suicide last week after many struggles returning to school and society since his release. (New Yorker)