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In wake of new union contract, 62 schools approved to 'break the rules'

PHOTO: Jessica Glazer
City and teachers union officials on Monday announced the schools that were selected to join a school-experimentation program.

When Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the city and the teachers union had agreed on a new contract two months ago, he promised that one provision would let schools “reinvent themselves.”

On Monday, city and union officials announced which schools will be able to do so by opting out of certain union rules and chancellor’s regulations, starting this September. Sixty-two schools were selected from 107 applicants to take part in the experimentation program, known as Progressive Redesign Opportunity Schools for Excellence.

The participating schools will be able to “break the rules,” as Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris put it, though the city offered few details about the dozens of plans for doing so that it approved in conjunction with the teachers union.

Particulars were provided for three of the schools, including the Community Health Academy of the Heights in Washington Heights, a neighborhood struggling with high obesity rates. The school wanted to incorporate lessons in the kitchen to teach students healthier eating and cooking habits, but was restricted from doing so because of rules related to the use of the kitchen, Principal Mark House said. Access to that space lets them experiment with ways to teach kids about health.

“This just makes sense,” House said.

Next year, the Academy, which teaches students in grades 6-12, will stagger class times so that older students begin school later than younger students. More than student learning, Chancellor Carmen Fariña said that change will help with teacher retention.

Debbie Mendez, a parent at the school and head of the PTA, agreed, recalling her own time as a teacher. Flexible schedules gives teachers “an opportunity to not burn out,” she said. “The amount of time and tolerance a teacher has [for students] is wonderful, but it gets challenging.”

Science teacher Amir Tusher, who has been at the school for eight years, said he is excited about changes to the school’s teacher evaluations. There will be an option for teachers to choose a specific skill to focus on, instead of having the principal sitting in the classroom and then deciding what skill the teacher should hone, he said.

In another proposal, the School of Integrated Learning, a middle school in Brooklyn, will mix large lecture classes with small classes for high-needs students. And Brooklyn International High School, where students are exempt from most Regents exams, has also developed a new teacher evaluation model that would include visits from peer teachers. The city did not explain what changes had been approved at the other 59 schools on Monday.

The scope of the changes has been the subject of debate since the contract was introduced, with some union members voicing concern about the implication that union contracts restrict innovation and that the program would weaken protections for teachers. Other union critics say the program won’t give enough freedom from contract rules for true experimentation.

“The lack of detail makes us wonder if this is just meant to distract us from the fact that the teachers’ contract puts too many restrictions on how schools are run,” Jenny Sedlis, executive director at StudentsFirst NY, said in a statement.

Without information on financial or other support for participating schools, there are also questions about how the schools will implement the changes.

The schools whose plans were announced Monday have already cleared two hurdles. The 62 schools met a tight deadline to develop their plans and have them approved by parent leaders after the contract was ratified. Once approved by the city and the union, 65 percent of a school’s unionized staff also approved the proposals.

The city and the union have said they plan to include 200 schools in the program over the next five years. The initial proposals, Fariña said, will “serve as a guide for all of our school communities.”

Participating schools:

Brooklyn
Brooklyn Democracy Academy
Brooklyn International High School
Brooklyn New School
Brooklyn School for Collaborative Studies
East Brooklyn Community High School
Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders
Gotham Professional Arts Academy
Kurt Hahn Expeditionary Learning School
Lyons Community School
Mark Twain Intermediate
Olympus Academy High School
P.S. 188 – The Michael E. Berdy School
The International HS at Prospect Heights
The School of Integrated Learning

Bronx
Bronx Arena High School
Bronx Collaborative High School
Bronx Community High School
Bronx High School for Law and Community Service
Bronx Lab School
Bronx Park Middle School
Bronx Writing Academy
Community School for Social Justice
Comprehensive Model School Project
East Bronx Academy for the Future
English Language Learners and International Support Preparatory Academy
Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School
KAPPA International High School
Pan American International High School at Monroe
The Bronx Compass High School
The Highbridge Green School

Manhattan
Academy for Software Engineering
Beacon School
Castle Bridge School
Central Park East II
City as School High School
Community Health Academy of the Heights (CHAH)
East Side Community School
Essex Street Academy
Frank McCourt High School
Harvest Collegiate
Humanities Preparatory Academy
Innovation Diploma Plus HS
Institute for Collaborative Education
Manhattan International High School
NYC iSchool
P.S. 353 The Neighborhood School
Satellite Academy High School
The Earth School
The Ella Baker School
The Facing History School
The James Baldwin School
Urban Academy Laboratory High School
Vanguard High School
West Side Collaborative Middle School

Queens
Academy for Careers in Television and Film
International High School
Middle College High School at LaGuardia Community College
North Queens Community High School
P.S. 71 Forest Elementary
The Flushing International High School
The International High School for Health Sciences
Voyages Preparatory South Queens

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What's Your Education Story?

As the 2018 school year begins, join us for storytelling from Indianapolis educators

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy/Chalkbeat
Sarah TeKolste, right, and Lori Jenkins at a Teacher Story Slam, in April.

In partnership with Teachers Lounge Indy, Chalkbeat is hosting another teacher story slam this fall featuring educators from across the city.

Over the past couple of years, Chalkbeat has brought readers personal stories from teachers and students through the events. Some of our favorites touched on how a teacher won the trust of her most skeptical student, why another teacher decided to come out to his students, and one educator’s call to ramp up the number of students pursuing a college education.

The event, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, is free and open to the public — please RSVP here.

Event details:

5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018
Tube Factory artspace
1125 Cruft St., Indianapolis, IN 46203
Get tickets here and find more on Facebook

School safety

Hiring more security officers in Memphis after school shootings could have unintended consequences

PHOTO: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Tennessee’s largest district, Shelby County Schools, is slated to add more school resource officers under the proposed budget for next school year.

Superintendent Dorsey Hopson earmarked $2 million to hire 30 school resource officers in addition to the 98 already in some of its 150-plus schools. The school board is scheduled to vote on the budget Tuesday.

But an increase in law enforcement officers could have unintended consequences.

A new state law that bans local governments from refusing to cooperate with federal immigration officials could put school resource officers in an awkward position.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen recently reminded school personnel they are not obligated to release student information regarding immigration status. School resource officers employed by police or sheriff’s departments, however, do not answer to school districts. Shelby County Schools is still reviewing the law, but school board members have previously gone on the record emphasizing their commitment to protecting undocumented students.

“Right now we are just trying to get a better understanding of the law and the impact that it may have,” said Natalia Powers, a district spokeswoman.

Also, incidents of excessive force and racial bias toward black students have cropped up in recent years. Two white Memphis officers were fired in 2013 after hitting a black student and wrestling her to the ground because she was “yelling and cussing” on school grounds. And mothers of four elementary school students recently filed a lawsuit against a Murfreesboro officer who arrested them at school in 2016 for failing to break up a fight that occurred off-campus.

Just how common those incidents are in Memphis is unclear. In response to Chalkbeat’s query for the number and type of complaints in the last two school years, Shelby County Schools said it “does not have any documents responsive to this request.”

Currently, 38 school resource officers are sheriff’s deputies, and the rest are security officers hired by Shelby County Schools. The officers respond and work to prevent criminal activity in all high schools and middle schools, Hopson said. The 30 additional officers would augment staffing at some schools and for the first time, branch out to some elementary schools. Hopson said those decisions will be based on crime rates in surrounding neighborhoods and school incidents.

Hopson’s initial recommendation for more school resource officers was in response to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that killed 17 people and sparked a wave of student activism on school safety, including in Memphis.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s recent $30 million budget boost would allow school districts across Tennessee to hire more law enforcement officers or improve building security. Measures to arm some teachers with guns or outlaw certain types of guns have fallen flat.


For more on the role and history of school resource officers in Tennessee, read our five things to know.


Sheriff’s deputies and district security officers meet weekly, said Capt. Dallas Lavergne of the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office. When the Memphis Police Department pulled their officers out of school buildings following the merger of city and county school systems, the county Sheriff’s Office replaced them with deputies.

All deputy recruits go through school resource officer training, and those who are assigned to schools get additional annual training. In a 2013 review of police academies across the nation, Tennessee was cited as the only state that had specific training for officers deployed to schools.