moot point

As hearing nears, Sheepshead students indict turnaround plan

In preparation to protest the closure of Sheepshead Bay High School tonight at a public hearing, students interrogated a cardboard cutout of Mayor Michael Bloomberg on video.

In the video, a student posing as an attorney stages a mock “cross-examination,” of the mayor and his plans, which involve closing and re-opening 33 schools this year under a federal reform model known as “turnaround.”

The city is holding hearings at 33 schools that are slated for turnaround, and two more begin tonight at Harlem Renaissance High School and Automotive High School. Each school will hold a hearing—a requirement of the closure process—with city officials, their respective Community Education Councils, and school community members between now and April 19. The citywide school board is set to vote on the closures a week later. The board, known as the Panel for Educational Policy, has never rejected a city proposal.

“Did you know that Sheepshead Bay High School has increased its high school grad rates from 52% to 64%. Would you agree that this represents a steady improvement?” A student asks in the video.

“Uh, well, over a few years… Yes,” ” a voice behind the cardboard cut out says.

The student continues: “Did you know the Sheepshead Bay High School ranks among the top schools in the nation in track and field? …Did you know that a student from Sheepshead Bay High School won the international moot court competition? Do you know about the many students who went and placed as finalists in writing competitions throughout the city and the state? …And yet you still call Sheepshead Bay a failing school?”

Students and teachers at Sheepshead Bay have not been active opponents of the plans until just a month ago, when they began organizing with the Alliance for Quality Education and spoke at a heated Brooklyn forum about the details of turnaround.

Officials “definitely should change their minds, if they saw what was going on in these schools,” Bruce Sherman, a guidance counselor who attended the forum told me. “Teachers are busting their butts, staying late for tutoring, doing all kinds of things to help the school. But they’ve had the sword of Damocles hanging over their heads.”

This afternoon they are planning to rally in front of the South Brooklyn campus in the hour before the hearing begins, and the moot court team is set to perform.

Re(new)al schools

New York City plans to merge, close, or shrink these 19 schools

PHOTO: Ed Reed for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio
Mayor Bill de Blasio.

The New York City education department plans to close 14 low-performing schools at the end of the academic year, officials announced Monday. You can read much more about those changes — and why they’re significant moves for Mayor Bill de Blasio — here.

Here’s the full list of changes the city is proposing.

The nine Renewal schools the city plans to close:

  • P.S. 50 Vito Marcantonio (District 4)
  • Coalition School for Social Change (District 4)
  • High School for Health Careers and Sciences (District 6)
  • New Explorers High School (District 7)
  • Urban Science Academy (District 9)
  • P.S. 92 Bronx School (District 12)
  • Brooklyn Collegiate: A College Board School (District 23)
  • P.S./M.S. 42 R. Vernam (District 27)
  • M.S. 53 Brian Piccolo (District 27)

The five other schools the city plans to close:

  • KAPPA IV (District 5)
  • Academy for Social Action (District 5)
  • Felisa Rincon de Gautier Institute (District 8)
  • Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation (District 12)
  • Eubie Blake School (District 16)

The schools the city plans to merge into others:

  • Holcombe L. Rucker School of Community (District 8), becoming part of Longwood Preparatory Academy, another Renewal school
  • Entrada Academy (District 12) into Accion Academy
  • Middle School of Marketing and Legal Studies (District 18) into East Flatbush Community and Research School
  • Middle school grades of Gregory Jocko Jackson School (District 23) into Brownsville Collaborative Middle School

Other changes:

  • Wadleigh Secondary School for The Performing Visual Arts (District 3) will no longer serve middle school students. It will start a plan “to transform Wadleigh into one of New York City’s top audition arts high schools,” according to the city.

The schools that will “graduate” from the Renewal program for showing improvements, gaining the designation of “Rise” school: 

  • P.S. 15 Roberto Clemente (District 1)
  • Orchard Collegiate Academy (District 1)
  • Renaissance School of the Arts (District 4)
  • I.S. 528 Bea Fuller Rodgers School (District 6)
  • P.S. 154 Jonathan D. Hyatt (District 7)
  • Bronx Early College Academy for Teacher and Learning (District 9)
  • DreamYard Preparatory School (District 9)
  • J.H.S. 80 The Mosholu Parkway (District 10)
  • The Bronx School of Young Leaders (District 10)
  • Urban Scholars Community School (District 12)
  • P.S. 067 Charles A. Dorsey (District 13)
  • J.H.S. 050 John D. Wells (District 14)
  • Ebbets Field Middle School (District 17)
  • East Flatbush Community Research School (District 18)
  • Brooklyn Generation School (District 18)
  • P.S. 328 Phyllis Wheatley (District 19)
  • Cypress Hills Collegiate Preparatory (District 19)
  • Pan American International High School (District 24)
  • P.S. 197 The Ocean School (District 27)
  • J.H.S. 8 Richard S. Grossley (District 28)
  • John Adams High School (District 27)

Re(new)al schools

New York City moves to close 14 struggling schools, including site of Bronx stabbing

PHOTO: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office
Mayor Bill de Blasio earlier this year with Chancellor Carmen FariƱa.

The New York City education department plans to close 14 low-performing schools at the end of the academic year, officials announced Monday, marking Mayor Bill de Blasio’s most aggressive effort to date to shutter struggling schools.

Nine of the proposed closures involve schools in the city’s “Renewal” program, which has marshalled extra funding and support for troubled schools. Among the five non-Renewal schools is the Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation, the Bronx high school where a student fatally stabbed a classmate in September, a school described by students and parents as chaotic and plagued by unchecked bullying.

The moves will leave over 4,500 students searching for new schools to attend next fall, and more than 400 teachers seeking new jobs. Officials said the department’s enrollment office would work individually with the students to make sure they land in high-performing schools, while human resources staff would support the teachers in finding new placements. However, it’s likely that some will end up in the pool of teachers who lack permanent positions and act as roving substitutes — a costly group that the de Blasio administration has been trying to shrink.

Even as the city seeks to shutter schools in the $582 million Renewal program that have made insufficient progress since the program launched in 2014, it is also creating a new pathway for improving schools to graduate out of the program. Twenty-one schools that have made academic and attendance gains will leave the Renewal program at the end of the academic year, freeing them from intense oversight by the education department.

The city will also move to combine five Renewal schools that enroll very few students, and remove the middle-school grades from a school that currently serves grades 6 to 12.

The changes, which still must be approved by an oversight panel during its meeting in February, would leave 46 schools in the turnaround program next year out of the current 78. While the Renewal program was originally cast as an intensive three-year intervention, the remaining schools will be entering their fourth year in the program. Renewal officials and superintendents will soon ramp up their presence in the schools, which will be expected to hit their progress goals by next November, officials said.

Families in the affected schools will receive letters about the proposals and personal phone calls Monday, officials said. Meanwhile, Chancellor Carmen Fariña was scheduled to brief reporters at the education department headquarters Monday morning.

The nine Renewal schools the city plans to close are:

  • P.S. 50 Vito Marcantonio (District 4)
  • Coalition School for Social Change (District 4)
  • High School for Health Careers and Sciences (District 6)
  • New Explorers High School (District 7)
  • Urban Science Academy (District 9)
  • P.S. 92 Bronx School (District 12)
  • Brooklyn Collegiate: A College Board School (District 23)
  • P.S./M.S. 42 R. Vernam (District 27)
  • M.S. 53 Brian Piccolo (District 27)

The five other schools the city plans to close are:

  • KAPPA IV (District 5)
  • Academy for Social Action (District 5)
  • Felisa Rincon de Gautier Institute (District 8)
  • Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation (District 12)
  • Eubie Blake School (District 16)

The schools the city plans to merge are:

  • Holcombe L. Rucker School of Community (District 8), becoming part of and Longwood Preparatory Academy
  • Entrada Academy (District 12) into Accion Academy
  • Middle School of Marketing and Legal Studies (District 18) into East Flatbush Community and Research School
  • Middle school grades of Gregory Jocko Jackson School (District 23) into Brownsville Collaborative Middle School