Taking the pledge

Colorado gubernatorial candidate Jared Polis goes back to school with preschool-pledge commercial

Congressman Jared Polis meets with teachers, parents and students at the Academy of Urban Learning in Denver after announcing his gubernatorial campaign. (Photo by Nic Garcia/Chalkbeat)

The 2018 Colorado gubernatorial race is in its early stages, but Democratic U.S. Rep. Jared Polis is making an initial — and modest — media pitch to voters on his education agenda.

With back-to-school season as a backdrop, Polis is debuting a new commercial exclusively on the internet that highlights his pledge to expand full-day kindergarten and provide tuition-free preschool to all Colorado families.

Chalkbeat was provided an exclusive first look at the commercial Monday.

“Every year, thousands of children — the kids of our friends and neighbors — are left behind simply because their parents cannot afford quality preschool,” Polis says on the ad over images of children in classrooms and on playgrounds. “Good, full-day preschool and kindergarten makes a tremendous difference in a child’s life. … I’m running for governor to fight for bold ideas like free, full day preschool.”

The 30-second video, which will be blasted to Colorado voters on social media, is just a glimpse at what is expected to be an avalanche of commercials from gubernatorial candidates. Colorado political observers believe the 2018 gubernatorial race will be the most expensive in the state’s history.

Although the governor’s office has relatively little influence over public schools, candidates from both major parties are incorporating messages about education into their platforms.

On the Democratic side, former state Sen. Michael Johnston has promised to provide tuition-free college, and businessman Noel Ginsburg wants to expand apprenticeship programs. Among Republicans, former state lawmaker Victor Mitchell, in a radio ad posted to YouTube this month, promises to boost vocational training.

Polis’s promise to create a “winning coalition to establish universal full day kindergarten and preschool” faces considerable roadblocks — the state is cash-strapped as it is, and voters historically have been unwilling to increases taxes for education on a statewide scale.

“If you don’t try, then it will result in failure every time,” Polis said in an interview with Chalkbeat before releasing the online ad. “Politicians have talked about preschool and kindergarten for decades in this state. And we’re going to make it a priority and get this done. … That’s where I’m going to use my political capital.”

To read more about Polis’s preschool pledge, click here. Here’s the commercial:

Rival Vision

Gubernatorial candidate Noel Ginsburg wants to do away with Colorado’s educator effectiveness law

Democratic gubernatorial candidates Donna Lynne, Noel Ginsburg and Cary Kennedy at a candidate forum hosted by the Colorado Association of School Boards. (Photo by Nic Garcia)

If elected governor, businessman Noel Ginsburg says he would work to expand apprenticeship programs, raise teacher salaries, send more money to schools – and repeal a signature legislative achievement of one of his Democratic primary rivals.

Ginsburg, who is running for elected office for the first time, currently runs CareerWise Colorado, an apprenticeship program that Gov. John Hickenlooper considers one of the chief accomplishments of his administration.

In its second year, it’s still a long way from reaching its goal of serving 20,000 students statewide. Ginsburg is also the founder and CEO of Intertech Plastics, a company that does custom injection molding, and the co-founder, with his wife Leslie, of the I Have A Dream Foundation, which works to increase the state’s high school graduation rate.

Ginsburg released an education platform this week that calls for putting a lot more money into education and giving teachers more of a voice in policy decisions. Teachers unions have already endorsed former state Treasurer Cary Kennedy.

Ginsburg told Chalkbeat he wouldn’t have minded getting their endorsement, but he understands that as a newcomer to politics, he needs to work hard to “claw my way to viability.”

“The teachers union, whether they support me or not, they will be my partners,” he said. “I don’t believe the unions have all the answers, but boy, do they deserve a seat at the table.”

Ginsburg’s education platform calls for:

  • Expanding high-quality apprenticeship programs
  • Filling the skills gap so that more students graduate into good-paying jobs
  • Convincing voters to approve changes to the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights to let the state keep more money
  • Convincing voters to approve tax increases for education
  • Restoring trust in government when it comes to education
  • Improving teacher pay
  • Repealing 2010 legislation that requires teachers to demonstrate effectiveness and ties teacher pay to student performance

Former state Sen. Mike Johnston, now a Democratic candidate for governor, was the author of that legislation, Senate Bill 191. A former teacher and school principal, Johnston stood behind the law in a 2016 Chalkbeat interview.

But Ginsburg said that in his view, the law had been used as a “club” against teachers and students.

“You need those measurements, but if you are measured by the measures in 191, you are measured by a system that is flawed,” he said. “It was well-intentioned at the time, but I don’t think it’s met the objectives.”

Kennedy’s education plan does not call for the abolition of Senate Bill 191, but supports giving more weight to teachers’ “perspectives and expertise” in evaluations.

Ginsburg has criticized other candidates in the Democratic primary for making promises that will be hard to deliver, particularly around education. U.S. Rep. Jared Polis wants to provide universal access to preschool, and Johnston wants to provide debt-free college in exchange for community service. Ginsburg said he would love to see both those things, but first the state needs to adequately fund the existing K-12 education system.

To do that, Ginsburg says he would lead a coalition to reform TABOR so that Coloradans keep the ability to vote on tax increases but the state gets to keep more of the money generated by a booming economy.

TABOR reform – a premise on which Kennedy’s education platform also depends – might seem just as unlikely if you look at Colorado history. But Ginsburg said he believes that with the right leadership, voters can be persuaded.

Ginsburg also is pledging to lead a campaign for a tax increase to fund education. Colorado voters have twice before rejected such measures, and a coalition of state and local school leaders want to put a tax increase for education on the ballot again this year. Ginsburg said he supports the general idea, but he’s not sure it’s the right proposal.

TABOR reform and tax increases for education don’t seem unrealistic or undoable to Ginsburg.

“If we cannot raise more dollars for education, it would ultimately leave me speechless,” he said. “We can either say we’re not going to make the investment, and we’re okay with declining opportunity for our students or … I cannot fathom a continuation of the current trends because I think it leads to a Colorado none of us can be proud of.”

Ginsburg sees apprenticeships as key to addressing income inequality and preserving the middle class.

Ginsburg said that as governor, he would use his “bully pulpit” to get more businesses involved in apprenticeship programs and to explain the value of these programs to students. He stressed that CareerWise largely does not depend on taxpayer dollars, nor is it a substitute for a four-year college degree for those who want to pursue one. CareerWise apprenticeships allow students to earn money and college credit as they learn work skills.

He described business and industry as missing players in the education world. Teachers are doing their job, he said, but they can’t possibly show students every way that math, science, reading, and writing will be applied in the work world.

“We put all the burden on K-12 and act as the consumer of the final product, and that’s not right,” he said. “We can share the burden.”

Read more about Cary Kennedy’s education platform here.

Read more about Jared Polis’ plan for universal preschool here.

Read about Mike Johnston’s plan for free college in exchange for community service here.

And read our take-aways from the first gubernatorial forum with an education focus here.

Next Generation

Here’s why advocates want Colorado students to ask the questions at a candidate forum on mental health

PHOTO: Andy Cross/Denver Post

When seven candidates for governor take the stage at a Denver forum on mental health next month, they’ll answer questions from Colorado residents who may still have braces and learner’s permits.

Students, that is.

Leaders of Mental Health Colorado, the advocacy group organizing the candidate forum on March 23, say they’re soliciting student questions because many young people already understand the impact of mental health problems.

“Kids are in some ways the best champions because they’re the closest to this issue,” said Andrew Romanoff, president and CEO of Mental Health Colorado. “Even if they’re not old enough to vote, they’re old enough to have a say.”

Colorado has one of the highest suicide rates in the nation and several school districts in the state have grappled with multiple student suicides in recent years.

Mental Health Colorado is asking middle school, high school, and college students to submit questions in advance of the event. The lunchtime forum will also feature some questions from adults.

Romanoff said the recent high school shooting in Florida by a 19-year-old with a long history of disturbing behavior has raised awareness about mental health issues, but doesn’t provide an accurate picture of how people coping with mental health problems behave.

“Most people with mental illness are not violent. In fact, they’re more likely to be the victim than the perpetrator,” he said.

There are “a lot of folks now saying we have to do something about mental health, and we welcome their support,” he said. “I don’t want to suggest that that alone will solve the nation’s gun violence crisis.”

So far, the gubernatorial candidates who have committed to attending the forum include Democrats Donna Lynne, Noel Ginsburg, and Erik Underwood, and Republicans Victor Mitchell, Cynthia Coffman, Lew Gaiter and Stephen Barlock.

To submit questions for the candidates, students can email deargovernor@mentalhealthcolorado.org. The deadline for submissions is March 19. For more information about the forum, visit the event page.