Leadership & Management

Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
The first-term mayor will be back in Albany sooner than he had hoped to renew mayoral control and will now also be tasked with shrinking class sizes.
Families and educators can’t plan for next year without answers to some important questions.
NYC education officials plan to expand transfer high schools to serve those students, using a Bronx school as one model.
‘I believe that virtual learning is here to stay whether or not we have a pandemic’ schools Chancellor David Banks says.
A four-year extension of mayoral control of city schools seems out of the picture for Mayor Eric Adams as he makes his pitch to Albany lawmakers.
Both Banks and Adams have signaled greater support for charter schools, but Banks’ addition to the charter school center board is not all that unusual.
The first-of-its-kind curriculum was meant to teach student students about urban planning and how to advocate for their neighborhoods.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
City officials warned that the PEP’s failure to approve the funding formula could delay funding to schools.
Questions remain about how the city will spend the remainder of billions in federal COVID stimulus funding on New York City’s school system.
“By not having a full board it kind of gives a message that it’s not a priority,” said Lori Podvesker, a former panel member.
Immigration advocates say that public schools can be “largely inaccessible” for thousands of immigrant students.
The delays could discourage some therapists from signing up for similar programs, complicating future efforts to provide extra help to students with disabilities.
“What we’re talking about today is the educational equivalent of long COVID,” Bloomberg said. “The good news is we know how to treat it.”
One of the largest pushes this year went toward expanding free child care. The city’s public schools will receive just over $12 billion in state funding.
The investment will be spread over four years and could help to stabilize an industry shaken by COVID.
With the end of the school year approaching, NYC schools have spent just about half of this year’s COVID relief, according to a comptroller report.
The pandemic helped drive the state’s decision to scrap the requirement, and follows reforms in recent years to teacher certification in New York.
The move immediately brought backlash from labor unions, after Adams said the city is not currently considering changing rules for city workers.
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