David Banks

The scores are the first measure of how students across the five boroughs have fared in reading and math since the coronavirus pandemic.
As Mayor Eric Adams stares down a massive budget shortfall, New York City has no clear plans to sustain its growing 3-K program.
Schools Chancellor David Banks’ comments prompted multiple City Council members to grill officials about the department’s plans on Wednesday.
The lack of communication about the new plan has sowed confusion and concern among staff and preschool providers.
About 3,000 students at 59 schools — generally rising juniors and seniors — will be selected by employers for apprenticeships paying from $15 to $25 an hour.
Staffers will be moved “to more effectively support schools in coordination with district superintendents,” the department says.
At least 1,000 new students are expected to enroll in district schools, including preschool-aged children.
“All this money that is meant for the kids in our public schools are going to private schools,” Chancellor Banks said. “Folks have figured out how to game this system.”
Student enrollment has big implications for public schools, and declines can lead to less funding and school closures or mergers.
A judge said the city did not follow proper rules when it approved the budget, paving the way for restoring hundreds of millions in cuts to schools.
Stimulus dollars were previously not allowed to cover teacher salaries, but officials changed their tune amid a fight over budget cuts.
Two parents and two teachers seek to invalidate the city budget, claiming that city officials failed to follow proper protocols before voting.
The eight-member expansion of the city’s education panel, which was passed under the original bill, will be delayed by five months.
Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
The city’s new virtual high school program could serve 200 ninth graders this coming school year.
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
Department officials plan to hire 200 coaches for grades K-5, down from roughly 500 coaches focusing on grades K-2 in prior years
NYC education officials plan to expand transfer high schools to serve those students, using a Bronx school as one model.
‘I believe that virtual learning is here to stay whether or not we have a pandemic’ schools Chancellor David Banks says.
A four-year extension of mayoral control of city schools seems out of the picture for Mayor Eric Adams as he makes his pitch to Albany lawmakers.
Both Banks and Adams have signaled greater support for charter schools, but Banks’ addition to the charter school center board is not all that unusual.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
Questions remain about how the city will spend the remainder of billions in federal COVID stimulus funding on New York City’s school system.
Immigration advocates say that public schools can be “largely inaccessible” for thousands of immigrant students.
The state’s English exams kick off Tuesday for grades 3-8. NYC schools Chancellor David Banks believes that too much test prep has led students to disengage and even drop out.
The school will combine JROTC and cybersecurity to ready students for cybersecurity careers as the sector sees a worker shortage.
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