David Banks

This year’s offer data shows very little change in racial and economic diversity, particularly for high school, despite seeing the biggest admissions changes.
Nearly half of NYC’s school districts are mandating their elementary schools use a single reading program come September.
Also known as the “festival of lights,” Diwali is observed by Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and some Buddhists as a celebration of light over darkness and good over evil.
With just a month until the school year ends, families are scrambling to find alternate summer programs for their children.
The decision to start the new school year with steady budgets, however, doesn’t mean schools are completely immune from cuts.
For future school years, education department officials are bracing for some big expenses to comply with the law.
City Council Speaker Adrienne Adams blasted the mayor’s approach to early childhood education, describing the system as “broken” and “in full crisis mode.
In the next two years, all NYC elementary schools will be required to overhaul literacy instruction.
As the city expects another wave of newcomer immigrant families, educators are worried it will become even more challenging to support English learners.
Two-thirds of that cut, or about $650 million, is the result of Adams’ decision to reduce the city’s contribution to the education department.
The education department’s spending per pupil has increased by 46%, in large part due to the billions in federal COVID aid the district received as enrollment has dipped.
The $78 million plan was first unveiled in January in the mayor’s preliminary budget.
The project involved counting up technology such as tablets, laptops, desktop computers, printers, and smartboards.
City Hall did not rule out the possibility that individual school budgets could be cut.
Education department officials are planning to rein in the city’s free-wheeling approach to curriculum. Whether they follow through is an open question.
There might be more attention on this year’s state tests, following the spotlight on last year’s dip in national test scores.
The vote by the city’s 23-member board — largely comprised by mayoral appointees — is not the final step for the agency’s budget.
NYC is beefing up career programs in education, technology, business, and health care. Officials are also offering hundreds of paid, three-year apprenticeships.
The move is a victory for advocates who have pushed to reduced police presence in schools, but it won mixed reactions from educators and union officials.
The seismic shift that made devices more accessible to students than ever before has now pushed some teachers to fold technology more often into their lesson plans.
The needs are high as data shows worsening mental health among young people, including more students reporting thoughts of suicide.
Schools Chancellor David Banks has been raising the alarm about the recent spate of killings and shootings involving young people, calling it a “state of emergency” that requires more intervention.
Lucy Calkins wrote a popular reading curriculum used in hundreds of NYC elementary schools that encourages independent reading. But the model has come under fire from schools chancellor David Banks.
The office’s creation comes as the education department’s own early childhood office has faced intense scrutiny over the past several months under Adams’ leadership.
Students could have fallen off school rosters for being homeschooled without registering with the state or skipping kindergarten. Others might have disengaged during remote learning or amid mental health struggles.
Banks revealed the plan Wednesday while outlining the financial costs of lowering newly required class sizes over the next five years.
Monday’s announcement represents the Adams administration’s gradual unpeeling of COVID-related rules established under former Mayor Bill de Blasio.
Addressing student mental health is a growing concern, as many students experienced trauma during the pandemic. Banks hasn’t yet unveiled a detailed plan for tackling the issue.
State lawmakers required the panel to grow from 15 to 23 members, in hopes of bringing more parent voices to the body.
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