But like most things within the nation’s largest school district, what happens across New York City’s 1,600 schools often varies school to school and even classroom to classroom.
The first-term mayor will be back in Albany sooner than he had hoped to renew mayoral control and will now also be tasked with shrinking class sizes.
Some blasted NYC’s move to screen all students’ social-emotional skills using an assessment called DESSA. This Brooklyn school has learned to embrace it.
The lessons will roll out as a pilot in fall 2022, with a full implementation planned for 2024.
NYC education officials are adding more than 1,000 seats, most of them as new programs that start in third grade. The city’s gifted programs are deeply segregated.
Streets near schools are uniquely dangerous, with rates of crashes and injuries that exceed NYC averages — particularly near schools where most students are poor or children of color.
A review of the upcoming history Regents exam after the racist Buffalo attack uncovered materials with “the potential to compound student trauma.”
A look at how Carlo Scissura, of the New York Building Congress, influenced a real estate deal for a school construction project.
Families and educators can’t plan for next year without answers to some important questions.
The SEED program aims to help students who have sensory issues that are “dramatically impacting their school performance.”
Many organizations will face tough decisions about laying off staff and cutting back services that have been a cornerstone of the city’s much-lauded Community Schools program.
Anxiety, depression, and chronic absenteeism are on the rise as many students and parents struggle with school refusal after prolonged campus closures during COVID.
As I prepared to discuss the racist violence, I couldn’t help but reflect on what conversations might be banned if I did not teach in New York City.
Icon-heart-donate
If you value Chalkbeat, consider making a donation
Chalkbeat is a nonprofit newsroom dedicated to providing the information families and educators need, but this kind of work isn’t possible without your help.
City officials warned that the PEP’s failure to approve the funding formula could delay funding to schools.
The Muslim holy month is 10 days earlier next year and could overlap again with state tests, families worry.
The COVID tests should be taken weekly, at least five days apart, according to an education department letter sent to families on Wednesday.
Questions remain about how the city will spend the remainder of billions in federal COVID stimulus funding on New York City’s school system.
“By not having a full board it kind of gives a message that it’s not a priority,” said Lori Podvesker, a former panel member.
Kate Belin talks about why she sees teaching as inherently political.
Immigration advocates say that public schools can be “largely inaccessible” for thousands of immigrant students.
“Everything has been like an emergency from the moment that I got here,” Banks said.
The delays could discourage some therapists from signing up for similar programs, complicating future efforts to provide extra help to students with disabilities.
“What we’re talking about today is the educational equivalent of long COVID,” Bloomberg said. “The good news is we know how to treat it.”
One of the largest pushes this year went toward expanding free child care. The city’s public schools will receive just over $12 billion in state funding.
The investment will be spread over four years and could help to stabilize an industry shaken by COVID.
Admission to gifted kindergarten programs will continue to be based on teacher recommendations, in lieu of admission based solely on a test administered to preschoolers.
Lessons about the largest and most documented genocide in human history need not rely on fiction.
Even if kids aren’t outwardly saying that they’re frightened, they may exhibit behaviors indicating that they are feeling scared.
With the end of the school year approaching, NYC schools have spent just about half of this year’s COVID relief, according to a comptroller report.
The pandemic helped drive the state’s decision to scrap the requirement, and follows reforms in recent years to teacher certification in New York.
Mayor Eric Adams wants to give summer jobs to all youth who want one. But undocumented youth can’t participate in the program.
Asian students like me make up the majority of those enrolled in NYC specialized high schools. Why was nobody asking for our input?
Getting this glimpse into my kids’ education felt like a gift after two years of pandemic restrictions.