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Applications open for 70,000 summer youth jobs in NYC

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Mayor Bill de Blasio holds an event for the Summer Youth Employment Program in 2016. He announced Monday that the application period is now open for this year’s program.

Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office

Applications are now open for New York City’s summer jobs program, which is expanding after being slashed last year, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday.

Students who are between 14-21 years old will have access to about 70,000 Summer Youth Employment Program slots, including a mix of in-person and virtual programming, bringing the program just shy of its pre-pandemic size. Last year’s fully remote program was about half the size, drawing criticism from providers and students

“One of the best things that we can do for young people is give them some continuity over the summer,” de Blasio told reporters. “We want to make sure they have opportunities that enrich them that helped them move forward and keep them inspired.”

New York City’s summer jobs program — the largest in the nation — can be a lifeline for students. Those in work-based programs running the gamut from construction to health care earn the minimum wage of $15 an hour, while younger students in project-based programs earn a stipend. As the pandemic has plunged many families into economic turmoil, these opportunities have become even more critical for some students who are helping their families financially. 

Some student advocates, including the group Teens Take Charge, have called on the city to dramatically expand the jobs program to about 150,000 slots so that any student who applies can participate.

Applications for this summer remain open through April 23; students can apply here or can call 311 for more information.

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