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Teacher on Cuomo's Common Core panel criticizes report

One of the two teachers on Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Common Core panel said Tuesday that its report was released without his approval or a chance for him and other members to provide their feedback.

“The report – and the process that produced it — is incomplete,” Todd Hathaway, a history teacher at East Aurora High School, said in a statement emailed by the state’s teachers union on Tuesday morning. “The report was released suddenly, even as final comments were still being solicited.”

Hathaway said the report, released Monday night, left out critically important recommendations that he said are necessary to correct the way the state has implemented the Common Core learning standards. The governor’s office “ignored my concerns” about the state’s testing policies, Hathaway said, saying that he opposed tying test scores to performance evaluations and that teachers cannot currently use the test scores to inform their instruction.

“The result is that some of the report’s conclusions and suggestions do not hold up to scrutiny,” Hathaway said. “I wouldn’t accept this kind of work from my students and I don’t accept it here.”

Cuomo’s panel did tackle several testing issues, recommending that the state limit the amount of classroom time that teachers should focus on test preparation and administration. It also suggested a ban on some types of standardized testing in early education grades, and a process to make it easier for district to reduce tests administered for teacher evaluations.

But Hathaway said those changes didn’t go far enough, arguing that the state should delay using tests in high-stakes decisions about teachers. “But that issue was never fully explored,” he said.

Cuomo has said that untying state tests to teacher evaluations is off the table.

Hathway was one of 11 members to serve on the panel. The other teacher, Nick Lawrence, is a eighth grade teacher at East Bronx Academy for the Future. In a statement put out by Cuomo’s office last night, Lawrence said the panel’s put forward “several recommendations that parents and educators can stand behind right away to start reforming the way Common Core is put in place here in New York.”

Hathaway’s full statement is below:

“The report – and the process that produced it — is incomplete. The report was released suddenly, even as final comments were still being solicited. I had indicated the likelihood I would dissent and not allow the report to be spun as “consensus.” Nevertheless, the report was issued with my name attached. I am very concerned that the report tries to make it seem like all the discussion had been completed. In fact, the Executive Office repeatedly ignored my concerns and the legitimate concerns of others about inappropriate state testing, the misuse of invalid tests for evaluations and the lack of transparency in state testing. The result is that some of the report’s conclusions and suggestions do not hold up to scrutiny. I wouldn’t accept this kind of work from my students and I don’t accept it here.”

“The failure to address testing and evaluation issues in a comprehensive way suggests the dynamics of the classroom will not change. The report seems to blame everybody else for the problems of the Common Core learning standards without adequately addressing the appropriateness of some of the standards and the testing that goes with it. This report should have addressed serious deficiencies in state testing. It should have discussed the lack of transparency in tests; the lack of diagnostic and prescriptive worth to teachers; the unacceptable delays in returning scores to school districts and the insanity of pretending there is validity to teacher ratings that are derived from student scores widely acknowledged to be invalid.”

“Finally, this panel should have recognized the need to pause in the use of assessments for high-stakes decisions for students and teachers. This would have allowed the State Education Department, as well as school districts, to refine the tests and testing materials; teachers to engage in the standards and develop a variety of lessons to meet them instead of just relying on modules; parents to understand the role and utility of data in education; and for teachers to receive the necessary professional development. Implementing massive curriculum changes do not just happen overnight. They take time. I fully support a delay in the use of tests in high-stakes decisions for students and teachers, but that issue was never fully explored. You can’t put students first if you put their teachers last.”

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