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Rise & Shine: Signs point to partial privacy for teacher ratings

  • All signs point to a coming deal to let parents but not the general public see teacher ratings in NY. (WSJ)
  • A comparison of two Bronx schools suggests that teachers, principals, and age groupings are key. (Post)
  • The city has approved a national archery foundation to operate programs in city schools. (Post)
  • Michael Winerip: A well liked East Side Middle School student was accepted by no high school. (Times)
  • A Bronx teacher wants to start a charter school that would let students follow their talents. (DNA Info)
  • Some families are keeping students home at Brooklyn’s M.S. 577, where mold was found. (Daily News)
  • Diane Ravitch: Potential for “unpleasant emotions” is a bad excuse for barring test topics. (Daily News)
  • City private schools are increasingly sending student to far-flung locations for field trips. (Times)
  • Two teachers from Entrada Academy were arrested on drug and weapons charges Friday night. (Post)
  • Colleges and universities are working to create racial diversity without using affirmative action. (Times)
  • A L.I. schools chief inked a contract for $400,000 a year even as Gov. Cuomo tries to cap salaries. (Post)
  • Across the country, Democratic mayors are challenging their cities’ teachers unions. (Washington Post)

Last week on GothamSchools:

  • The city and UFT were apparently united on a touchy topic: absent students in teacher ratings. (Friday)
  • Very different feelings were on display at three schools holding the first turnaround hearings. (Thursday)
  • A charter school aiming to enroll high-needs students released early application numbers. (Thursday)
  • At long last, the city formally asked the state for federal funding for its turnaround plans. (Wednesday)
  • Principals at turnaround schools are being told they don’t have to replace half of teachers. (Wednesday)
  • Budget cuts mean teachers are spending more time out of school to grade state tests this year. (Tuesday)
  • The City Council grilled Chancellor Walcott on the schools budget and was told not to worry. (Tuesday)

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