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Rise & Shine: Budget talks include privacy for teacher ratings

  • State lawmakers are in discussions about how to shield teacher ratings from the public. (Daily News)
  • The teachers union is pushing lawmakers to restore funding for teacher support centers. (SchoolBook)
  • The state wants the makers of new tests to avoid uncomfortable topics, such as birthdays. (Post)
  • The reporters who found cheating in Atlanta found 200 other districts have suspect scores, too. (AJC)
  • Chancellor Walcott reassured charter school operators that he would encourage their schools. (AP)
  • Some Teaching Fellows say the city should revamp the 12-year-old training program. (Daily News)
  • More weapons are being confiscated in city schools, but fewer of them are guns. (Post)
  • City students and teachers are in the thick of preparations for this year’s state tests. (NY1)
  • The Post says recent news about New York’s graduation rate gains shouldn’t be celebrated.
  • Some city parents are trying to time their pregnancies to optimize their private school chances. (Post)
  • Across the country, school districts are opting out of serving ammonia-treated beef. (Times)
  • Some in Connecticut are concerned about charter schools that serve only very needy students. (WSJ)
  • Michael Winerip: A fight over a district’s web access reveals a murky underworld of web filters. (Times)

Last week on GothamSchools:

  • A Bronx teacher offers a semester-long training course on “assimilation” into college culture. (Friday)
  • The city is bulking up programs that train teachers for schools undergoing radical reforms. (Friday)
  • Three schools that were set to close next year have been showing signs of life and fight. (Thursday)
  • The city’s teacher hiring landscape appears more open than at any time in recent years. (Wednesday)
  • Students at a Brooklyn high school showcased their studies in democratic participation. (Wednesday)
  • Educators in Manhattan’s District 2 discussed the transition to Common Core standards. (Wednesday)
  • A new feature to showcase findings of education researchers started with college readiness. (Tuesday)
  • Some teachers told officials that the Common Core standards have come on too quickly. (Monday)

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