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Rise & Shine: Walcott prepares for his first PEP meeting

  • Walcott visited the space for tonight’s PEP to “absorb the dynamics of the auditorium.” (WSJ)
  • State Sen. Flanagan will hold hearings to probe the city’s teacher discipline process. (Post)
  • Two city schoolteachers will appear on Jeopardy!’s two-week teacher special. (WNYC)
  • Walcott’s visit to Robeson High School kept a promise to the student PEP member. (Daily News)
  • “It’s time to lower the rhetoric on charters,” Walcott said on the John Gambling show. (WOR, WNYC)
  • The $100 million suit against the city for Cathie Black’s appointment is deemed “ridiculous.” (Post)*
  • Cursive handwriting, not widely considered a 21st century skill and not tested, is taught less. (Times)
  • The urban mother accused of illegally sending her child to a suburban school plead not guilty. (Times)
  • A teacher paid a fine and returned to teaching after using a Spanish swear word. (El Diario via Voice)
  • A Wadleigh HS grad with a love for ties is the only American working in the royal wedding. (Post)
  • Gates and Pearson are releasing 24 online math and English classes tied to common core. (Times)

*The story published in today’s Post print edition described the lawsuit as “ridiculous” by saying that “everyone acknowledged” it as so. The story originally published online also included that description. But at some point this morning, that wording was revised to say that even the people who filed the lawsuit “admit” the suit is “unusual.”

The original sentence read, “In a notice of claim filed yesterday that everyone acknowledged is ridiculous, the newly formed New York City Parents Union puts the wreckage of Black’s tumultuous tenure at $100 million.” The sentence now in the story’s web version instead begins, “In a notice of claim filed yesterday that even the filers admit is unusual.”

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