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Rise & Shine: UFT fighting for the status quo — on subway fares

News from New York City:

  • Two state politicians have proposed giving more school control to borough presidents. (Post)
  • Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum is meeting with lawmakers to push her vision of mayoral control. (Post)
  • More than 100 elementary schools can’t accommodate all of their zoned students. (Daily News)
  • The DOE is raising class size to 25 in a number of overenrolled elementary schools. (Post)
  • The UFT is planning to lobby against the fare hike planned by the MTA. (Post)
  • City Councilman Eric Gioia is proposing a ban on new fast food restaurants near schools. (Times)
  • A whistleblower says many schools lack basic fire safety mechanisms. (Daily News)
  • Charter school advocates are pushing to get some of the state’s stimulus money. (Daily News)
  • Beth Fertig reports on the differences between schools in Amsterdam and New York City. (WNYC)
  • Because of violence in Mexico, the DOE cancelled a trip there for some Brooklyn students. (Post)
  • The city is cutting funding for program that uses retirees as tutors. (Daily News)
  • The Economist‘s education writer visits TFA founder Wendy Kopp and several NYC schools.
  • The Post revisits last year’s political fight over whether test scores should be used in tenure decisions.
  • Newest in the Post‘s series on mayoral control: The introduction of A-to-F progress reports.
  • The principal of PS 272 in Brooklyn explains how the school went from an F to an A. (Post)
  • The Post revisits the mayor’s prediction that chaos would follow changes to mayoral control.

Opinions:

  • The Post grits its teeth and lauds Randi Weingarten’s MTA moves.
  • In a letter to the editor, Joel Klein says the NAEP test isn’t a good measure of the city’s schools. (Times)
  • Chancellor Klein makes the case against the status quo in a Daily News column.
  • The Post wonders why the UFT is so “ill-disposed” when “they’ve never had it better than since 2002.”
  • Lenore Skenazy, the mom who let her kid take the subway alone, reports on a lack of outdoor play. (Post)
  • A Post columnist says some upstate teachers are being represented by a union against their will.
  • Jay Greene: The UFT represents how teachers unions try to kill all school reform. (Wall Street Journal)

And beyond:

  • As the number of autistic students grows, so do arguments over the cost of educating them. (Times)
  • Representatives from 41 states attended a conference on national standards this week. (EdWeek)
  • The idea of national standards isn’t new. (Time)
  • Philadelphia’s school head wants to supervise the chief school investigator. (Philadelphia Inquirer)
  • Jay Mathews describes an effort to give young teachers a voice in school reform. (Washington Post)
  • Even good schools are focusing on “bubble kids,” Jay Mathews reports. (Washington Post)
  • A new study shows that self-esteem boosts student achievement. (Times)
  • Time Magazine brands Arne Duncan an “apostle of reform.”

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