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Rise & Shine: Study finds a boost for charter-sapped schools

  • The Gates Foundation will let all 50 states to seek its Race to the Top help, not just its chosen 15. (Times)
  • A Manhattan Institute study: Schools whose students leave for charters get a reading score boost. (Post)
  • Marcus Winters, the study’s author, explains the effects on students “left behind” in district schools. (Post)
  • The Daily News says the study should forever end the “creaming” charge against charter schools.
  • The ban on bake sales could cut down on how much money student groups can raise. (Village Voice)
  • A judge ruled that DC-37 must pay school aides’ salaries while their firing suit is pending. (Daily News)
  • A look at what the hiring restrictions might mean for schools this year and next. (Village Voice)
  • An audit by Bill Thompson found the city didn’t give federal grant money to needy schools. (Daily News)
  • Criticism about schools doesn’t seem to stick to Mayor Bloomberg. (Crain’s New York, sub required)
  • Two City Councilmen say the city should provide school safety officers to private schools. (Daily News)
  • A Queens family is upset that their daughter has to attend test prep instead of dance. (Daily News)
  • Park Slope parents are bringing world-class musicians to play a benefit concert for PS 321. (Daily News)
  • A former NBA coach is the gym teacher at the high-paying Equity Project Charter School. (NPR)
  • Nat Hentoff praises PS 636’s efforts to help its many homeless students. (The Trentonian)
  • H1N1 flu vaccines in schools start today. (NY1)
  • Middle and high school students are now eligible again for priority-round flu shots. (Daily News)
  • Community colleges are offering classes in the middle of the night to meet student demand. (Times)
  • A new policy in Los Angeles allows parents to vote to close and reconstitute their schools. (L.A. Times)
  • Michelle Rhee asked principals for advice about how to win trust from D.C. teachers. (Washington Post)
  • A report finds that Chicago’s school closures didn’t move students to better schools. (Chicago Tribune)