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Reading teacher: Amidst all the assessments, when do we teach?

Miss Brave, a New York City second grade teacher, got pumped to use her students’ reading data to plan really focused interventions this month:

So I stayed at school until after dark two days this week, planning and organizing my strategy lessons and guided reading groups until I was sure everything would run like clockwork. I pored over those running records and really got down to the nitty-gritty of the weaknesses we needed to tackle — I even felt like a bit of a rogue, planning strategy lessons that included Fundations work, but I was all, “The only thing holding these kids back is that they’re miscuing all the words that include vowel teams and blends, so let’s do it!” I felt really energized by the latest round of running records and ready to get down to business tackling my students’ weak areas one by one to help them move to the next reading level. Third grade, here they come!

Or so I thought. Because you know what happens when you get really energized by planning, don’t you?

What happened started with a memo she never received… and that’s just the beginning.

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