News from New York City:

  • Educators fear city high schoolers won’t be able to pass a fifth Regents exam, as they now must. (Post)
  • As competition for selective city middle schools has intensified, tutoring firms have flourished. (Times)
  • Some schools, such as P.S. 15 and P.S. 189, spent the break in intense test prep. (NY1Insideschools)
  • Charter school supporters don’t like Assemblyman Keith Wright’s bill that could limit co-locations. (Post)
  • Wright is also one of several sponsors of a bill that would strip the city’s mayor of school control. (Post)
  • Eighth-graders’ state science test scores are mediocre and unchanged over the last decade. (Post)
  • State education chief John King said he is sure the city will get new teacher evaluations. (S.I. Advance)
  • The state teachers union chief says he would accept a ratings’ release for parents only. (Daily News)
  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo said releasing the ratings widely would be a “knee-jerk reaction.” (Daily News)
  • The city is getting a growing number of complaints about teachers’ inappropriate Facebook use. (Post)
  • Special Commissioner of Investigation Richard Condon says he needs more investigators. (Daily News)
  • The city complains that it can’t punish teachers, but in fact a discipline system exists for them. (WNYC)
  • Two years into a federal grant program to help struggling schools, the city has little to show for it. (NY1)
  • Lawmakers questioned and city officials defended turnaround. (GothamSchools, SchoolBookNY1)
  • Bushwick Community High School’s supporters protested its planned turnaround. (GothamSchools, NY1)
  • Families are upset that J.H.S. 80 in the Bronx will have had three principals this year. (Daily News)
  • The founder of a Brooklyn charter school chain was charged with tax fraud. (GothamSchoolsPostNY1)
  • More kindergarteners applied for and qualified for gifted programs. (GothamSchools, Times, Post)
  • A data watchdog gave mixed reviews to school letter grades. (GothamSchoolsDaily NewsSchoolBook)
  • The lawyers arguing that the city should speed its cleanup of PCBs in schools laid out their case. (NY1)
  • A teacher at LaGuardia High School was beaten to death, allegedly by her son. (PostDNAInfo, Times)
  • A federal judge okayed a religious discrimination suit against a Bronx assistant principal. (Daily News)
  • Families and colleagues remembered Fortunato “Fred” Rubino at a memorial service. (Brooklyn Paper)
  • The Daily News says it’s not fair that the city could fire an elderly teacher but not some who misbehaved.
  • The Post says Cuomo should fill an open seat on the state’s charter school board with a supporter.
  • The city’s Blue School is emerging as a laboratory for incorporating neuroscience into education. (Times)

And beyond:

  • Louisiana is poised to adopt vouchers not just for schools but for business apprenticeships. (WSJ)
  • Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel still wants to lengthen the school day, but not by as much. (Sun-Times)
  • A former high school teacher praises a new breed of schools that exalts creative thinking. (WSJ)
  • The Posse Foundation, which helps urban students attend college, is expanding to Houston. (Times)
  • Michael Winerip: Some students use community colleges as a step to selective universities. (Times)
  • Cleveland’s mayor, who has control of that city’s schools, is taking on the teachers union. (AP)