News from New York City:

  • Among Mexican immigrants in New York City ages 16-19, more than 40 percent are dropouts. (Times)
  • Hundreds of students at Grace Dodge High School went without English classes for weeks. (Daily News)
  • Michael Winerip: Long Island principals are in rare revolt over the state’s teacher evaluations. (Times)
  • But very few city principals have so far signed on to the effort to slow the evaluations. (GothamSchools)
  • City public and private schools are bringing back wooden blocks as an instructional tool. (Times)
  • High school principals scramble to get students into the building to preserve city funding. (SchoolBook)
  • More than 100 students commute from outside Staten Island to high-achieving Staten Island Tech. (Post)
  • A judge ruled that the city must release emails between mayoral officials and Cathie Black. (Reuters)
  • Parents at the Special Music School say the school has added too much test prep. (Insideschools)
  • No Child Left Behind waivers are raising questions about NCLB’s private tutoring. (WNYC/SchoolBook)
  • This year, a Bronx Science counselor is advising students on NCAA eligibility requirements. (Daily News)
  • Students at the Hudson High School of Learning Technologies got a visit from a real-life scientist. (NY1)
  • The Post says CUNY colleges’ low completion rate shows high school requirements should be tougher.
  • Eva Moskowitz: There’s no reason to oppose my school in Cobble Hill to get a pre-K program. (Post)
  • The Daily News says the situation at Grace Dodge supports the theory that city schools are warehouses.
  • A Democracy Prep Charter School student says teacher Sarah Benko has pushed her to succeed. (NPR)
  • An M.S. 35 teacher was arrested for having a sexual relationship with a student. (Daily NewsPostNY1)
  • A Staten Island teacher convicted of manslaughter was fired for threatening an ex-boyfriend. (Post)

And beyond:

  • Nonpartisan education reform groups are adopting new strategies and flush with cash support. (HuffPo)
  • Teach for America’s national and international expansion is renewing questions about its value. (AP)
  • Albany’s charter schools opted out of Race to the Top and also new teacher evaluations. (Times-Union)
  • Detroit’s schools could be fined for posting lower than 75 percent attendance on 46 days. (Detroit News)
  • In Texas, Rick Perry’s funding plan has left schools without arts or foreign language classes. (Bloomberg)
  • Historians and educators are squabbling over how history should be taught in Britain’s schools. (Times)
  • Brownsville, Texas, is locking in its $400,000 for its chess program even as other areas are cut. (Times)
  • Now that they are part of a reform agenda, school closures are growing heated in Chicago. (Times)
  • For-profit teacher certification that often happens online is getting a foothold in Texas. (Times)
  • A new survey of Chicago teachers finds they do not want their evaluations tied to test scores. (Tribune)
  • Across the D.C. area, districts are working to make more schools data available. (Washington Post)